GibbonChapter48

Quotations from Chapter 48 of Edward Gibbon's History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire ("Plan of the Last Two [Quarto] Volumes; Succession and Characters of the Greek Emperors of Constantinople, from the Time of Heraclius to the Latin Conquest (641-1185 A.D.)"):


A being of the nature of man, endowed with the same faculties, but with a longer measure of existence, would cast down a smile of pity and contempt on the crimes and follies of human ambition, so eager, in a narrow span, to grasp at a precarious and short-lived enjoyment. it is thus that the experience of history exalts and enlarges the horizon of our intellectual view. In a composition of some days, in a perusal of some hours, six hundred years have rolled away, and the duration of a life or reign is contracted to a fleeting moment: The grave is ever beside the throne; the success of a criminal is almost instantly followed by the loss of his prize; and our immortal reason survives and disdains the sixty phantoms of kings who have passed before our eyes, and faintly dwell in our remembrance.


(see also Gibbon _-_Table_of_Contents, Gibbon_-_Thoughts_Upon_Reading, ... and http://www.his.com/~z/gibbon.html for a single-page presentation of Gibbon quotes)


TopicLiterature


(correlates: Gibbon - Table of Contents, NeighborhoodEffects, OnSilence, ...)